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technology may be the most powerful tool they have to help put a anytime face trace galt gear live in our west coast newsroom to explain how it works. >> while the debate goes on, megyn, on whether to release the surveillance pictures of potential suspects. we can tell you that authorities are saying that they are, quote, pretty clear of the man's face. pretty compelling stuff they say. and it appears to be a younger man. so let me show you how this facial recognition technology works. it's all about measuring the facial features. for example, the eye socket depth, cheekbone shape, the distance between the eyes, the nose width and the jaw line length. they take all these numbers and come up with numerical code or facial print. not the size of a fingerprint but still very very close. e tter of picture, clearly the better chance they hav matching it now, what happens is in mo cases, in fact we use an intern, let's show this video if you are just trying to identify the person is who they say they are that process is simple. take the person's driver's license. take a picture of them, facial c
? is there facial recognition technology? or do they have to rely on people saying i know that guy? >> there is facial recognition technology, but to tell you the truth, honestly, when i was in a little kid i met a hero detective who solved a very tough case involving a sniper and i said how did you do it? and he wrote something that i can't repeat on the air, but it was basically knock on doors and get off of your derriere. facial recognition can only take you so far. i think it will be a member of the public. the reporting has been extraordinary, i think cnn, you guys, fox and msnbc have really done a very good job. and part of that is getting evidence in there that they think is important but when strung together it will come together, but is a very human intensive process. all of the photographs and video, really have to go through a set of eyes not a computer. >> michael: yeah, and that's amazing, and of course that's why we had you on brian, to talk about exactly how good of job we have done covering this story. but we really appreciate your input, beca
personnel along our borders as well as utilization of proven surveillance technology along the highest traffic areas across the southwest border. reducing wait times at the ports of entry the budget requests 35rks00 port officers. to scurel maritime borders the budget invests in coast guard assets, including the seven national security cutter and fast response cutters. the bum continues the department's focus on smart enforcement of our country's immigration laws. it supports the administration's effort to focus the enforcement system on safety threats and the integrity of the immigration system through childhood arrivals and greater use of rosecutor yull discretion. we support more cost effective initiatives of secure communities. e budget invests in monitory compliance to work sight related laws. while continuing to support alternatives to the tension, detention reform and immigrant immigration efforts. comprehensive immigration reform will help us build on these efforts and strengthen boarder security by enabling d.h.s. while focusing on criminals, human smallingers and those who im
shops and sold online. the company's vice president of technology says they are horrified to find out their batteries can be used in such an act. >> horrified, appalled, shocked. batteries used for toys, rc cars and trucks and to see it used in such a way is
of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
that, there were huge leaps in technology and biometrics and facial recognition system. i can imagine now the state-of-the art is that much further along. i'm sure it will be a big part in helping identify. >> when we talk about this mounds and mounds of evidence, it's really two different crime scenes essentially. we had two bomb sites. are they treating each of these independently or look for commonalities between the two? >> absolutely on the commonalities. think of it in terms of one major crime scene, death scene here, with some of the best technicians in all of law enforcement anywhere. going over the scene meticulously. typically starting in the peripheral and then working in in concentric circles. i'm sure technicians are still there at this point. >> all right. you know, i want to talk a little bit about how these guys are putting this case together because obviously as they're gathering the forensic evidence, at some point there has to be, you know, we're talking about potentially there may with suspects identified or certainly persons they're interested in speaking to. at s
that can go on as well with the way that this is developing. >> what kind of technology do they have that -- that could help them with this? i mean, when you talk to any investigator, any district attorney, they talk about the effect of television programs where the technology is so much more sophisticated than in real life but what about things like facial recognition? >> well, i think that's key. agencies like immigration and customs enforcement and customs and border protection are huge in a case like this because they might be able to tell you about something, if there was reason for some person to be a foreign visitor or foreign traveler, but facial recognition software, you know, when it's in certain places, airports or some place, can be upheld, but you don't know how somebody might have come or could be a local person so it's only limited. the more value is the digital age. if that praf is photograph is pn everybody's iphone, on the national media and everybody starts calling in. everybody starts calling in. i think it's my uncle freddy. i think it's joe down the street, and
and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more, sunday at 8:00 and c- span's "q&a". came into the white house. she was a 47-year-old lady who hated politics. thewas deeply depressed at death of her last surviving son. especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. friends,ot have many unfortunately she had a wonderful family who kept her going. there always seem to be somebody there. i do not think he read very much. she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. with that intellect and wonderful education, it seemed wasted in some way. >> the conversation on jayne pearce, the life of the 14th president, is now available on our web site. tune in monday for our next program on the first lady, mary todd lincoln. >> this documentary comes from zachary cohen of the adele davis academy in sandy springs, georgia. his message to the president looks at funding for education. it is a second prize-winning video in this year's c-span studentcam competition. >> this is
and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and the ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more sunday at 8:00 on c- span's "q &a." >> when the war began, congress came into session in july and issued the clinton resolution that articulated the consensus, or goals of the united states. and it was very simple. very clear. the purpose of this war is to restore the union. disrupt thet to social institutions of the south. everyone knew what that meant. in it meant not to disrupt slavery. texas austinsity of professor on the political and legal factors of emancipation on lectures in history saturday night at 8:00 eastern. >> second prize winners in the student cam competition. there documentary of the city." ♪ >> long before barack obama was president you work as a chicago community organizer after college. president obama's as part of why he went into politics was to make a difference for people on the south side and similar places throughout the country, but even after countless federal and dollarsomises,
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
sleeping? just wanted to check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers.
investment in renewable and energy. give the benefit of the technology got when they were young industry. >> is it the anticipation in the next ten or fifteen years that all of the renewables will be able to catch up in surpass what is currently with oil, gas, and coal. >> over time. >> i have no problem with wind and hydroelectricity and solar. the assumption that we're going take away normal business expense from oil and gas and coal which will slow down the reduction and increase price. the same as the cigarette tax currently in the budget actually said we want to decrease usage by increasing the price. we get rid of revenue. it seems to be the same with oil, gas, and coal. we increase the price at the pump or home heating oil or electricity increase the price of those and try to supplement off to other areas which every economist i've seen deals with energy economy said those technologies probably not for thirty years or more to get close it catching up. 9 percent of the portfolio we supplement the other 1eu89%. >> i don't think the proposal on oil and gas industry work. i would be h
technology works. you go into places like grand central station you see some of the devices. they have markings from the epa on it. we also had some project bio shield and some other legislation that create ad group within the department of health and services to contract for things like vaccines and antidotes for some of these agents. we haven't funded early stage science looking at next generation of science to help protect us against future threats. jenna: being you worked in the government and the private sector what do you think is the government's role in that? some of us think, the government must have vials of antidotes stashed somewhere when something happens to help us. where is the government's role in this? where is the private sector and how do we best prepare if that is something we should be watching for? >> we'll have to provide substantial incentives for people to do the investment there is no natural market. the government is only purchaser. they trade the antidotes to hope to get stockpiled by the government and that is not a good environment. when companies lose out
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i think it would've been great fun to see that all of the week as part of immigration reform just by unanimous consent. >> jerry? >> i have a couple of them. i had ask you why you think so highly of our late mayor, grover cleveland? >> f. i was allowed to go back when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests. he also seemed to veto a bunch of bills, and i think that, you know, it was a time period, and i think some would call him a populist and i think that part of me feels that way. >> alex and then bolton. >> it was reported you were raising money for the national association for gun rights and it was just reported that last week this came up for conversation in the steering committee luncheon. susan collins was pretty upset about that because national association of gun rights is running ads in her state. she i
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